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Knees Over Toes Guy


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I just found the knees over toes guy.  VERY brief precis : he recommends carefully designed exercises that revolve around the concept of pushing your knees over your toes.

If you've ever heard the common exercise trope that you should never push your knees over your toes, you'll know what he's referring to.

You can get the first part totally free from scribd.  Google it and you'll find the document.  

I have just started it myself and will inform you of progress.  Feel free to add to this thread with your own progress.

He is blowing up right now with superb reviews and feedback - this looks like it could be life changing.

Some example YT videos : 

 

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From my 20+ years in the gyms and studying training, I can assure you this guy knows what he's talking about. 

Knees past the toes is only not so good for older individual or people who are prone to knee injuries or excessively heavy or obese people or inexperienced trainers who lack good communication with their body and might hurt themselves.

That's why your instructor cuts it short and tells you not to do it. 

There is a classic exercise called Sissy Squat and it's all about excessively passing your knees further than the toes. I used to do it often, but now at my age and weight and shape I honestly do not do it. 

 

 

 

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Just now, 1David1Solomon1 said:

Knees past the toes is only not so good for older individual or people who are prone to knee injuries or excessively heavy or obese people or inexperienced trainers who lack good communication with their body and might hurt themselves.

The progression is steady and slow, and he emphasises time after time DO NOT EVER WORK THROUGH PAIN.

I sent it to my old man (69 AND obese), to work through.

He's had testimonials from 89 year olds too.  So, it looks like it's good for all ages.

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I see. If it works for him, that's fine well and nice 🙂 

Me at 41 only at this not so good shape and after all the wear and tear from the weights I used to hoist and over the years, unless I'm fully pumped up (which again rarely happens these days) I feel pain when I go past the knees , so I refrain from it.  

There are so many complexities and personal differences Steve, I can't explain it here. It's just too much to type. Training is science, art and philosophy. 

(for example people who have virgin bodies and never done serious sports training  before, while they are at disadvantage, they still have some other advantages too and thus their training methods should very much differ form say a guy in his 40's or 50's who was an ex-athlete in his younger years). 

There are other psychological differences too between athletes and normal people in relation to aging and training . Let me explain:  

Two guys, Jack and Stephen, 

1- Jack was an Olympic hammer thrower, he  trained since he was an early teen and by the age of 26 he was a F#n BEAST.  He ages to 48, he's still doing good to his age but compared to his yester years he's pathetic. Deep down it hits him hard to have transformed from Superman to just a normal man. 

2- Stephen has always been an office guy. He just keeps active, plays some corporate football matches and hits the gym once in a while. By the age of 44, for whatsoever reason he decides to train seriously for the first time in his life.

He joins the gym and this time with a qualified personal trainer and he trains 5 days a week.  He also does Yoga classes after the gym twice a week. He feels stronger and better than he ever felt in his life before. He thinks he's became Superman (although he's no where near Jack in his prime days, but now he's actually more fit and in a better shape than Jack is today). 

Does that explain what I'm trying to convey in here?  

There are exceptions to this example indeed but this is what generally happens in real life.  

 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, 1David1Solomon1 said:

I see. If it works for him, that's fine well and nice 🙂 

Me at 41 only at this not so good shape and after all the wear and tear from the weights I used to hoist and over the years, unless I'm fully pumped up (which again rarely happens these days) I feel pain when I go past the knees , so I refrain from it.  

There are so many complexities and personal differences Steve, I can't explain it here. It's just too much to type. Training is science, art and philosophy. 

(for example people who have virgin bodies and never done serious sports training  before, while they are at disadvantage, they still have some other advantages too and thus their training methods should very much differ form say a guy in his 40's or 50's who was an ex-athlete in his younger years). 

There are other psychological differences too between athletes and normal people in relation to aging and training . Let me explain:  

Two guys, Jack and Stephen, 

1- Jack was an Olympic hammer thrower, he  trained since he was an early teen and by the age of 26 he was a F#n BEAST.  He ages to 48, he's still doing good to his age but compared to his yester years he's pathetic. Deep down it hits him hard to have transformed from Superman to just a normal man. 

2- Stephen has always been an office guy. He just keeps active, plays some corporate football matches and hits the gym once in a while. By the age of 44, for whatsoever reason he decides to train seriously for the first time in his life.

He joins the gym and this time with a qualified personal trainer and he trains 5 days a week.  He also does Yoga classes after the gym twice a week. He feels stronger and better than he ever felt in his life before. He thinks he's became Superman (although he's no where near Jack in his prime days, but now he's actually more fit and in a better shape than Jack is today). 

Does that explain what I'm trying to convey in here?  

There are exceptions to this example indeed but this is what generally happens in real life.  

 

 

 

I understand completely.  However from what I've seen this a complete system to bulletproof the most commonly weak areas for most people : knees, hips, lower back etc.  The progression and emphasis on pain free training means you're not likley to injure yourself - and you're training in a way that prevents further injury later in life.

To take it to its logical conclusion using your hypothetical example; if Jack had trained properly in his younger years (using KOT, for example), he would be in a much better position today, and way in front of Stephen who lacks the genetics and training history to match Jack's physical prowess.

The guy openly criticises commonly accepted wisdom of physical training and conditioning (such as no knees over toes).  If he's right, then what he's introduced will quickly surpass other training regimes and basically change how we think about fitness training, physio and injury prevention for the forseeable future..

Which is exactly what seems to be happening.  It doesn't look like a fad.

 

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30 minutes ago, 1David1Solomon1 said:

unless I'm fully pumped up (which again rarely happens these days) I feel pain when I go past the knees , so I refrain from it.  

Have a look at the first part.  I cannot attach it here.  You don't get near KOT until you're ready for it - which you will be if you follow it step by step.

The document is on Scribd as I said in the intro.  He is deliberately trying to offer the first part for free.

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Just now, Soyaan said:

I had knees pain but after walking 6 months last year regular its goes away. Walking excellent way of helping with knee pain. Their are same other work out you can do to help but you got be careful with knees.

The guy does know what he's talking about and he's getting excellent results.  The comments I see on his videos cannot be faked, and I can tell someone with genuine knowledge.  

I'm all in.  Doing well so far - update soon!

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